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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

Frankie Alika

Frankie Alika

Artist Work

Shattered
2013
Acrylic on Canvas
24" X 30"
Between Realms
2013
Acrylic on Canvas
24" X 24"
Mother and Child
2014
Acrylic and Beads on Canvas
24" X 36"
Mother Nature II
2014
Acrylic and Beads on Canvas
36" X 24"
Rays of Hope
2014
Acrylic on Canvas
24" X 30"
The Effect
2013
Acrylic on Canvas
24" X 30"

Artist Information

County
Prince George's County
Phone
202-717-3256
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

The theme of my works varies from family value to nature. The colors blue and yellow are predominating in my works because it symbolizes nature also, Blue is considered beneficial to the mind and body, health, healing, tranquility. I often incorporate images and motifs into my works on Canvas and paper. My aim is to project the African art and promote better understanding of African culture. I sing to the people of the world with my brush and paints. As I tell a lot of stories on canvas and various media. I sing with a loud melodious voice with colors and brush on Canvas and release the aesthetic value expressing my feelings about family values, traditions and environments. Some of my works… The Rays of Hope, The Expectation and the others expresses the inner turmoil that we as humans pass through at certain stage or stages of our lives... but in everything that happens to us as individuals, we should have hope.

Artist Bio

I began a five –year course in art at the Federal Polytechnic Auchi, Edo State. Nigeria. However this provided me with a career at a Publishing Firm in Lagos. My professional practice of art, commenced in early 1998, my works has involved the creation of concept based abstract African motifs. My works addresses the fragility of family dynamics, culture and nature.

In 2000, I began experimenting with ink, Water mixable oil, Acrylic and Pastel, to form my medium of expression. I later discovered that it was easy to manipulate especially in bringing out the “Uli” designs (a form of abstract African motifs) of the prehistoric people of the eastern Nigeria, used to decorate walls, bodies’ et al. which is till practice till date. In traditional scenarios the typical uli mural on mud walls was done with earth colors numbering about four: nzu/ocher, edo (yellow), ufịẹ (red), oji (black). Blue (from washing blue) was added much later to the palette. The colors were applied to a prepared wall in a variety of manner and style to generate graphic imageries. These imageries combine the collective myth of the community and the idle aspirations of the artist. I went back in time to have an infusion into my work. The style I use, is an infusion of abstract and Uli design, I call my style “Abstract Uli-ism”.