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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

ED GROSS

ED GROSS

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Artist Work

New 3D Metal Collage 26
2012
Found objects- Painted aluminum template rusted corregated steel, copper, iron
16 x 25 x 3
3D Metal Collage 14
2011
patined copper, painted computer disc, copper electric strips
20 x 25 x 1
3D Metal Collage 55
2015
Found objects
24x24x2
3DMetal Collage 20
2005
Found objects
24x20x3
3D Metal Collage 58
2015
Found objects
15x13x2
3D Metal Collage 56
2015
Found objects
24x24x2

Artist Information

County
Baltimore City
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

In the early 1990’s when I first started to work as an artist, my focus was on creating sculptures. The timeworn quality of the old farm implements that I have been collecting helped form the vision for my work. I first started working with farm equipment that was fashioned years ago of hand-wrought metals and are very sculptural in themselves. I tried to preserve the integrity of these artifacts while assembling them into forms that appeal to me. I also discovered great sources of steel, aluminum, copper and other metals during my treasure hunts. In searching for a way to show off the beauty of these artifacts, I found that juxtaposing these well-used parts with the textures and intricacies of modern day machine parts along with wood and other materials, allowed me to create something entirely new: a work of art that enhances the complexities of each. The interaction of the new and old creates an intensity that is not found in one alone. As I go beyond the forms themselves, I often add color to enhance the texture and depth of the piece. In many cases, the work that I create take on lives of their own, developing a personality and character that often sets a mood that seems to speak to viewers in various ways. As I continue my search through junk yards, (the goldmines for the objects that become my art) I am also captivated by what lies beneath the rust and grime. The stories that accompany these parts are often as intriguing as the parts themselves. I try to convey something of their stories in my sculptures.In the early 1990’s when I first started to work as an artist, my focus was on creating sculptures. The timeworn quality of the old farm implements that I have been collecting helped form the vision for my work. I first started working with farm equipment that was fashioned years ago of hand-wrought metals and are very sculptural in themselves. I tried to preserve the integrity of these artifacts while assembling them into forms that appeal to me. I also discovered great sources of steel, aluminum, copper and other metals during my treasure hunts. In searching for a way to show off the beauty of these artifacts, I found that juxtaposing these well-used parts with the textures and intricacies of modern day machine parts along with wood and other materials, allowed me to create something entirely new: a work of art that enhances the complexities of each. The interaction of the new and old creates an intensity that is not found in one alone. As I go beyond the forms themselves, I often add color to enhance the texture and depth of the piece. In many cases, the work that I create take on lives of their own, developing a personality and character that often sets a mood that seems to speak to viewers in various ways. As I continue my search through junk yards, (the goldmines for the objects that become my art) I am also captivated by what lies beneath the rust and grime. The stories that accompany these parts are often as intriguing as the parts themselves. I try to convey something of their stories in my sculptures.

Artist Bio

From Meteorologist to Artist
In 2007 I retired as a meteorologist after 50 years of work and have been focusing mainly on my art, from sculptures to functional art to metal collages .I have been working in this arena for over two decades. Being self taught with no formal training, my work has been exhibited at numerous shows and exhibits in the Washington, DC/Baltimore area. Most importantly, I love what I’m doing.

Sustainable Art: From the Junkyard to the Gallery
Over the past few years, I have begun a new phase in my work by creating functional furniture as well as a large series of 3D metal collages. In my furniture series, I am creating cocktail and other tables using oak from a German log cabin built in Indiana during the 1850’s, and old copper from our friends Yellow Barn Farm in Zelienople, PA .Old patinaed gutters and downspouts come from an upper Baltimore County house and the local junk yards that let me explore provide some of the other findings for my work. It is really exciting to find these treasures with all their natural color and beauty and to be able to integrate them into new works of art.From Meteorologist to Artist
In 2007 I retired as a meteorologist after 50 years of work and have been focusing mainly on my art, from sculptures to functional art to metal collages .I have been working in this arena for over two decades. Being self taught with no formal training, my work has been exhibited at numerous shows and exhibits in the Washington, DC/Baltimore area. Most importantly, I love what I’m doing.

Sustainable Art: From the Junkyard to the Gallery
Over the past few years, I have begun a new phase in my work by creating functional furniture as well as a large series of 3D metal collages. In my furniture series, I am creating cocktail and other tables using oak from a German log cabin built in Indiana during the 1850’s, and old copper from our friends Yellow Barn Farm in Zelienople, PA .Old patinaed gutters and downspouts come from an upper Baltimore County house and the local junk yards that let me explore provide some of the other findings for my work. It is really exciting to find these treasures with all their natural color and beauty and to be able to integrate them into new works of art.