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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

ROBERT TALBERT

ROBERT TALBERT

Artist Work

War Weary
2012
Watercolor
16.75 inches c 12 inches wide
Kinderlehk
2012
Watercolor
16.5 inches high x 22 inches wide
Under Her Parasol
2012
Watercolor
15 inches high x 13.5 inches wide

Artist Information

County
Montgomery County
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

MY ARTISTIC VISION I am intrigued by the junctions between realism and abstraction in art. It reminds me of walking at the beach with the ocean on one side and land surfaces on the other. The place where water touches land has always been magical for me, and I have discovered the same magic between representational art and abstract art. I like walking the edge between the two worlds. There is great beauty in everyday things, and these are the things I like to paint. It might be the way the sun hits the back of my neighbor's garage or the arch in a horse's neck as she reaches for some new grass. The most beautiful moments frequently catch me unawares and show up in places I least expect. I have learned to walk through life with a camera and sketch pad. I love capturing the beauty of ordinary people living their lives and engaging in activities that display their inner emotions and inner selves. MY SUPPORT I am indebted to my family, who have provided encouragement and motivation, in addition to serving as some of my best models! My wife, Becky, has been an equal partner in this endeavor and has contributed much to the artistic merit of my work through her brilliant photography and her incomparable eye for composition. Of my many art mentors, two stand above the others—Mark Kohler and Ted Nuttall—and I am indebted to them for their unselfish sharing of knowledge and insight into this vast and intricate puzzle called creating a painting.MY ARTISTIC VISION I am intrigued by the junctions between realism and abstraction in art. It reminds me of walking at the beach with the ocean on one side and land surfaces on the other. The place where water touches land has always been magical for me, and I have discovered the same magic between representational art and abstract art. I like walking the edge between the two worlds. There is great beauty in everyday things, and these are the things I like to paint. It might be the way the sun hits the back of my neighbor's garage or the arch in a horse's neck as she reaches for some new grass. The most beautiful moments frequently catch me unawares and show up in places I least expect. I have learned to walk through life with a camera and sketch pad. I love capturing the beauty of ordinary people living their lives and engaging in activities that display their inner emotions and inner selves. MY SUPPORT I am indebted to my family, who have provided encouragement and motivation, in addition to serving as some of my best models! My wife, Becky, has been an equal partner in this endeavor and has contributed much to the artistic merit of my work through her brilliant photography and her incomparable eye for composition. Of my many art mentors, two stand above the others—Mark Kohler and Ted Nuttall—and I am indebted to them for their unselfish sharing of knowledge and insight into this vast and intricate puzzle called creating a painting.MY ARTISTIC VISION I am intrigued by the junctions between realism and abstraction in art. It reminds me of walking at the beach with the ocean on one side and land surfaces on the other. The place where water touches land has always been magical for me, and I have discovered the same magic between representational art and abstract art. I like walking the edge between the two worlds. There is great beauty in everyday things, and these are the things I like to paint. It might be the way the sun hits the back of my neighbor's garage or the arch in a horse's neck as she reaches for some new grass. The most beautiful moments frequently catch me unawares and show up in places I least expect. I have learned to walk through life with a camera and sketch pad. I love capturing the beauty of ordinary people living their lives and engaging in activities that display their inner emotions and inner selves. MY SUPPORT I am indebted to my family, who have provided encouragement and motivation, in addition to serving as some of my best models! My wife, Becky, has been an equal partner in this endeavor and has contributed much to the artistic merit of my work through her brilliant photography and her incomparable eye for composition. Of my many art mentors, two stand above the others—Mark Kohler and Ted Nuttall—and I am indebted to them for their unselfish sharing of knowledge and insight into this vast and intricate puzzle called creating a painting.MY ARTISTIC VISION I am intrigued by the junctions between realism and abstraction in art. It reminds me of walking at the beach with the ocean on one side and land surfaces on the other. The place where water touches land has always been magical for me, and I have discovered the same magic between representational art and abstract art. I like walking the edge between the two worlds. There is great beauty in everyday things, and these are the things I like to paint. It might be the way the sun hits the back of my neighbor's garage or the arch in a horse's neck as she reaches for some new grass. The most beautiful moments frequently catch me unawares and show up in places I least expect. I have learned to walk through life with a camera and sketch pad. I love capturing the beauty of ordinary people living their lives and engaging in activities that display their inner emotions and inner selves. MY SUPPORT I am indebted to my family, who have provided encouragement and motivation, in addition to serving as some of my best models! My wife, Becky, has been an equal partner in this endeavor and has contributed much to the artistic merit of my work through her brilliant photography and her incomparable eye for composition. Of my many art mentors, two stand above the others—Mark Kohler and Ted Nuttall—and I am indebted to them for their unselfish sharing of knowledge and insight into this vast and intricate puzzle called creating a painting.MY ARTISTIC VISION I am intrigued by the junctions between realism and abstraction in art. It reminds me of walking at the beach with the ocean on one side and land surfaces on the other. The place where water touches land has always been magical for me, and I have discovered the same magic between representational art and abstract art. I like walking the edge between the two worlds. There is great beauty in everyday things, and these are the things I like to paint. It might be the way the sun hits the back of my neighbor's garage or the arch in a horse's neck as she reaches for some new grass. The most beautiful moments frequently catch me unawares and show up in places I least expect. I have learned to walk through life with a camera and sketch pad. I love capturing the beauty of ordinary people living their lives and engaging in activities that display their inner emotions and inner selves. MY SUPPORT I am indebted to my family, who have provided encouragement and motivation, in addition to serving as some of my best models! My wife, Becky, has been an equal partner in this endeavor and has contributed much to the artistic merit of my work through her brilliant photography and her incomparable eye for composition. Of my many art mentors, two stand above the others—Mark Kohler and Ted Nuttall—and I am indebted to them for their unselfish sharing of knowledge and insight into this vast and intricate puzzle called creating a painting.

Artist Bio

Art has engaged me on multiple levels my whole life. Like many people, I drew and painted as a child, and I regularly watched my father paint watercolor landscapes of Illinois farm and railroad scenes. When I was in the third grade, I entered a children's coloring contest sponsored by our local newspaper. Instead of using color crayons, I painted the image with tempera paint and took first place. This started my love affair with painting.

I took art classes in high school and later in college. My last year in college I took a watercolor painting course and became very frustrated with the quality of my output. I am sure the instructor did a fine job, but I mistakenly assumed that I should be able to paint a masterpiece without mastering the basics of drawing, values, composition, and color theory. At the end of the class, I threw away my paints and brushes and told myself I did not have real talent for art.

For 35 years I continued to watch my father paint, and I visited art galleries and talked to artists every chance I got. But I did not take any meaningful steps toward BECOMING an artist myself. In 2009, at age 59 and while visiting my father in Arizona, I asked Dad toArt has engaged me on multiple levels my whole life. Like many people, I drew and painted as a child, and I regularly watched my father paint watercolor landscapes of Illinois farm and railroad scenes. When I was in the third grade, I entered a children's coloring contest sponsored by our local newspaper. Instead of using color crayons, I painted the image with tempera paint and took first place. This started my love affair with painting.

I took art classes in high school and later in college. My last year in college I took a watercolor painting course and became very frustrated with the quality of my output. I am sure the instructor did a fine job, but I mistakenly assumed that I should be able to paint a masterpiece without mastering the basics of drawing, values, composition, and color theory. At the end of the class, I threw away my paints and brushes and told myself I did not have real talent for art.

For 35 years I continued to watch my father paint, and I visited art galleries and talked to artists every chance I got. But I did not take any meaningful steps toward BECOMING an artist myself. In 2009, at age 59 and while visiting my father in Arizona, I asked Dad toArt has engaged me on multiple levels my whole life. Like many people, I drew and painted as a child, and I regularly watched my father paint watercolor landscapes of Illinois farm and railroad scenes. When I was in the third grade, I entered a children's coloring contest sponsored by our local newspaper. Instead of using color crayons, I painted the image with tempera paint and took first place. This started my love affair with painting.

I took art classes in high school and later in college. My last year in college I took a watercolor painting course and became very frustrated with the quality of my output. I am sure the instructor did a fine job, but I mistakenly assumed that I should be able to paint a masterpiece without mastering the basics of drawing, values, composition, and color theory. At the end of the class, I threw away my paints and brushes and told myself I did not have real talent for art.

For 35 years I continued to watch my father paint, and I visited art galleries and talked to artists every chance I got. But I did not take any meaningful steps toward BECOMING an artist myself. In 2009, at age 59 and while visiting my father in Arizona, I asked Dad toArt has engaged me on multiple levels my whole life. Like many people, I drew and painted as a child, and I regularly watched my father paint watercolor landscapes of Illinois farm and railroad scenes. When I was in the third grade, I entered a children's coloring contest sponsored by our local newspaper. Instead of using color crayons, I painted the image with tempera paint and took first place. This started my love affair with painting.

I took art classes in high school and later in college. My last year in college I took a watercolor painting course and became very frustrated with the quality of my output. I am sure the instructor did a fine job, but I mistakenly assumed that I should be able to paint a masterpiece without mastering the basics of drawing, values, composition, and color theory. At the end of the class, I threw away my paints and brushes and told myself I did not have real talent for art.

For 35 years I continued to watch my father paint, and I visited art galleries and talked to artists every chance I got. But I did not take any meaningful steps toward BECOMING an artist myself. In 2009, at age 59 and while visiting my father in Arizona, I asked Dad toArt has engaged me on multiple levels my whole life. Like many people, I drew and painted as a child, and I regularly watched my father paint watercolor landscapes of Illinois farm and railroad scenes. When I was in the third grade, I entered a children's coloring contest sponsored by our local newspaper. Instead of using color crayons, I painted the image with tempera paint and took first place. This started my love affair with painting.

I took art classes in high school and later in college. My last year in college I took a watercolor painting course and became very frustrated with the quality of my output. I am sure the instructor did a fine job, but I mistakenly assumed that I should be able to paint a masterpiece without mastering the basics of drawing, values, composition, and color theory. At the end of the class, I threw away my paints and brushes and told myself I did not have real talent for art.

For 35 years I continued to watch my father paint, and I visited art galleries and talked to artists every chance I got. But I did not take any meaningful steps toward BECOMING an artist myself. In 2009, at age 59 and while visiting my father in Arizona, I asked Dad to