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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

RICHARD SCHELLENBERG

RICHARD SCHELLENBERG

Artist Work

Three Stories in Four Parts
2007
Video, LCD screens, steel, wood
6'x2'x2'
Randomness/Order
2007
mixed
Projected video/stand 3'x2'x4'
That's Better, stand w/video
2008
Video, easel, projector, glass, mirror
4'x3'x2'
Random/Order white
constructed painting oil and wood
48"x48"

Artist Information

Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

After painting for a number of years in the 1980's I started working three dimensionally. Although I still paint, the pieces are likely to be constructed out of wood or other materials rather than flat canvas. In the 1990's video became an integral component in my work and I started incorporating them into my sculpture. The video animated the sculpture with light and sound while the sculptural elements enhanced and articulated aspects of the video. I like the physical rewards of including sculptural elements with the video. Making an object allows me to stay connected to the work. There is a remove when you are shooting and editing digitally, and by making objects I feel more engaged and connected to the work while also introducing a tactile element. I've come to believe that my art and life is about returning. Not in a nostalgic sense, but looking at the past with new eyes. I explore themes that intrigue me: how people simplify their existence, and attempt to find order in random events through religion, ritual, logic, or art. I re-imagine my own experiences, memories and dreams to explore these ideas. Each of the experiences used have remained vivid over many years. Of course there is a distillation, not telling the whole tale, but the heart of it, the spiritual and emotional core. They are essentially little re-imagined documentaries seen from the inside out. Often here is no narrative, videos are presented more like paintings with key elements emphasized. Each element’s action is of a specific, defining moment, and is looped and repeated over and over. As the filmmaker Michael Haneke describes his own fragmented films, and I think it is apt for my work too, “It’s a clarity of description but without explination.”