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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

RACHEL SITKIN

RACHEL SITKIN

Artist Work

Frontera
2011
Gouache on Paper
30" x 40"
Valle de Colca
2011
Gouache on Paper
21" x 20"
A Slow Build
2011
Graphite on Paper
15" x 30"
San Cristobal
2011
Gouache on Paper
15" x 15"
The View From Up Here
2011
Gouache on Paper
21" x 20"

Artist Information

County
Baltimore City
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

The theme of my work is the evolving relationship between humans and the landscape. It appears to me that we live in an era of shifting cultural consciousness regarding the place and power of humans in the world. This conceptual shift effects us spiritually, socially, and economically. Though I consider it from many angles, I find the visual manifestation of this relational evolution the most intriguing. Through my work, I aim to participate in a dialogue around the complicated issues of land use and to invite others to consider these issues as well. I generally render scenes of human geometry, industrial, agricultural or residential geometries, imposed on naturally occurring organic land formations. I consider these landscapes both as sites of commodified nature and as the beautiful archeological relics they will become. The pre-existing topography of the land dictates a three-dimensional direction to the architectural placement. The shapes left (by the suggested figure) in pursuit of resources and progress reveal an elegant geometry unique to our species. The resultant landscape is a meeting of the slow accumulation of matter over millennia, and the precise, efficient alterations at human hands. Though environmental impact is one of my concerns, I am more interested in the visual metaphor these scenes become for our simultaneous ownership over and dependence on the land. By accenting the beauty of the resultant landscapes, I hope that viewers will consider the broader picture.The theme of my work is the evolving relationship between humans and the landscape. It appears to me that we live in an era of shifting cultural consciousness regarding the place and power of humans in the world. This conceptual shift effects us spiritually, socially, and economically. Though I consider it from many angles, I find the visual manifestation of this relational evolution the most intriguing. Through my work, I aim to participate in a dialogue around the complicated issues of land use and to invite others to consider these issues as well. I generally render scenes of human geometry, industrial, agricultural or residential geometries, imposed on naturally occurring organic land formations. I consider these landscapes both as sites of commodified nature and as the beautiful archeological relics they will become. The pre-existing topography of the land dictates a three-dimensional direction to the architectural placement. The shapes left (by the suggested figure) in pursuit of resources and progress reveal an elegant geometry unique to our species. The resultant landscape is a meeting of the slow accumulation of matter over millennia, and the precise, efficient alterations at human hands. Though environmental impact is one of my concerns, I am more interested in the visual metaphor these scenes become for our simultaneous ownership over and dependence on the land. By accenting the beauty of the resultant landscapes, I hope that viewers will consider the broader picture.