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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

Judith Kornett

Judith Kornett

Artist Work

John With Snails
2015
ceramic
18x16x15 inches
Barnacle
2015
ceramic
14x11x11 inches
Ben with one Raku Leg
2016
Wood fired Ceramic, paint
17x22x16 inches
Fish Eagle
2016
raku fired ceramic, feathers
18x12x8 inches
Relief
2015
Raku fired ceramic, feathers
13x6x6 inches
Elephant
2015
Raku fired ceramic,metal, glass, plastic, paint
7x12x8 inches

Artist Information

County
Prince George's County
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

My work is a hybrid of expressionistic and naturalistic figurative sculpture, expressing intense emotion in the form of readily recognizable imagery. They are often dark in nature, still retaining a certain sense of whimsy through such devices as embellishment and subject matter. I focus not only on the natural forms and details of the apparent subject, but also on their relationship to the emotions and experiences of both artist and viewer, always attempting to evoke responses that are personal in nature. These sculptures are not meant to comfort, but instead to confront and challenge, while retaining the elements of humor and the fantastic. The viewer will hopefully hypothesize about their meaning, deal with their effect and develop a willingness to see them as something other than simple aesthetic objects. Fired using either raku or wood and salt firing techniques, complex textures are an integral element of the work, and may range from the seductive pearlescent metallic and crackle of raku, to the moody deep patinas that develop during the wood/ salt firing process. Often embellished with wire, fiber, beads, feathers and animal hair, the end result is a work of art designed to entice without being “pretty”. My work is a hybrid of expressionistic and naturalistic figurative sculpture, expressing intense emotion in the form of readily recognizable imagery. They are often dark in nature, still retaining a certain sense of whimsy through such devices as embellishment and subject matter. I focus not only on the natural forms and details of the apparent subject, but also on their relationship to the emotions and experiences of both artist and viewer, always attempting to evoke responses that are personal in nature. These sculptures are not meant to comfort, but instead to confront and challenge, while retaining the elements of humor and the fantastic. The viewer will hopefully hypothesize about their meaning, deal with their effect and develop a willingness to see them as something other than simple aesthetic objects. Fired using either raku or wood and salt firing techniques, complex textures are an integral element of the work, and may range from the seductive pearlescent metallic and crackle of raku, to the moody deep patinas that develop during the wood/ salt firing process. Often embellished with wire, fiber, beads, feathers and animal hair, the end result is a work of art designed to entice without being “pretty”.