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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

Hilary Hachey

Hilary Hachey

Artist Work

Spinning Wheel Ring
2014
sterling silver
2.00"x1.00"x0.50"
T-Square Ring
2013
sterling silver
1.20"x1.25"x0.25"
Mobile Pendant
2012
sterling silver, fabric
1.75"x1.00"x1.00"
Five Tier Bracelet
2012
sterling silver, fabric
2.00"x3.25"x0.20"
Lantern Earring
2012
sterling silver, fabric
2.17"x0.50"x0.50"
Copernicus Brooch
2014
sterling silver, nickel silver
2.00"x2.00"x0.35"

Artist Information

County
Baltimore City
Artistic Category

Traditional Arts, Visual Arts

MSAC Individual Artist Award (IAA)
2015

Artist Statement

"I consider my work to be architectonic. That is, a type of perceived sensibility to form and design that prefers the simple over the complex, and the well-built over the mass-produced." I adopted the Bauhaus name for my jewelry because the Bauhaus aesthetic utilizes economy of method and severe geometry of form. My metalwork, hand-fabricated in sterling silver and 18k gold, achieves this through experimentation with the figure/ground relationship. The creation of mechanisms and clasps unique to my designs unites the spirit of both fine artist and craftsman. I often use oxidation to create contrast within a piece. Contrast and opposition combined with repetition are the building blocks of my design. By translating a design into wearable adornment, I aim to find the intersection of fine art and the production of functional objects. Hilary studied metalsmithing at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She creates each of her pieces by hand in her Baltimore studio. "I consider my work to be architectonic. That is, a type of perceived sensibility to form and design that prefers the simple over the complex, and the well-built over the mass-produced." I adopted the Bauhaus name for my jewelry because the Bauhaus aesthetic utilizes economy of method and severe geometry of form. My metalwork, hand-fabricated in sterling silver and 18k gold, achieves this through experimentation with the figure/ground relationship. The creation of mechanisms and clasps unique to my designs unites the spirit of both fine artist and craftsman. I often use oxidation to create contrast within a piece. Contrast and opposition combined with repetition are the building blocks of my design. By translating a design into wearable adornment, I aim to find the intersection of fine art and the production of functional objects. Hilary studied metalsmithing at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She creates each of her pieces by hand in her Baltimore studio.

Artist Bio

"I consider my work to be architectonic. That is, a type of perceived sensibility to form and design that prefers the simple over the complex, and the well-built over the mass-produced."

I adopted the Bauhaus name for my jewelry because the Bauhaus aesthetic utilizes economy of method and severe geometry of form. My metalwork, hand-fabricated in sterling silver and 18k gold, achieves this through experimentation with the figure/ground relationship. The creation of mechanisms and clasps unique to my designs unites the spirit of both fine artist and craftsman. I often use oxidation to create contrast within a piece. Contrast and opposition combined with repetition are the building blocks of my design. By translating a design into wearable adornment, I aim to find the intersection of fine art and the production of functional objects.

Hilary studied metalsmithing at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She creates each of her pieces by hand in her Baltimore studio.
"I consider my work to be architectonic. That is, a type of perceived sensibility to form and design that prefers the simple over the complex, and the well-built over the mass-produced."

I adopted the Bauhaus name for my jewelry because the Bauhaus aesthetic utilizes economy of method and severe geometry of form. My metalwork, hand-fabricated in sterling silver and 18k gold, achieves this through experimentation with the figure/ground relationship. The creation of mechanisms and clasps unique to my designs unites the spirit of both fine artist and craftsman. I often use oxidation to create contrast within a piece. Contrast and opposition combined with repetition are the building blocks of my design. By translating a design into wearable adornment, I aim to find the intersection of fine art and the production of functional objects.

Hilary studied metalsmithing at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She creates each of her pieces by hand in her Baltimore studio.

"I consider my work to be architectonic. That is, a type of perceived sensibility to form and design that prefers the simple over the complex, and the well-built over the mass-produced."

I adopted the Bauhaus name for my jewelry because the Bauhaus aesthetic utilizes economy of method and severe geometry of form. My metalwork, hand-fabricated in sterling silver and 18k gold, achieves this through experimentation with the figure/ground relationship. The creation of mechanisms and clasps unique to my designs unites the spirit of both fine artist and craftsman. I often use oxidation to create contrast within a piece. Contrast and opposition combined with repetition are the building blocks of my design. By translating a design into wearable adornment, I aim to find the intersection of fine art and the production of functional objects.

Hilary studied metalsmithing at The Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland. She creates each of her pieces by hand in her Baltimore studio.