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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

ERIC CELARIER

ERIC CELARIER

Artist Work

Wasteland XI
2011
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
36" x 58"
Wasteland XIV
2010
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
24" x 36"
Wasteland XIV
2011
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
57 " x 40"
Wasteland:Inscrutable Complexity I
2011
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
72" x 120"
Scale Shot of Wasteland:Inscrutable Complexity
2011
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
72" x 120"
Wasteland 5.8
2009
Mixed Media: Circuit Board, Wood, and Leather
80" x 56"

Artist Information

County
Montgomery County
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

<p>“Wasteland” explores the boundary between the useful and worthless. The juxtaposition of discarded computer boards with obsessive stitching, pushes this paradoxically seductive media beyond its simple found beauty to exploration of the art history - from the Neolithic to the Contemporary. Leather frames border each piece, simultaneously connecting and breaking the composition’s discrete sections. </p> <p>“These arrangements lead the viewer to ponder the scale and meaning of the materials presented. While retaining the qualities of a traditional American scrap quilt, viewers report interpretations as far ranging as microbial structures to aerial photographs of landscapes. Larger pieces can be examined closely for their detail or scanned as a whole for their dramatic composition. Mural sized designs have the ability to completely erase peripheral vision, leaving the onlooker lost in an intricate maze of manufactured parts.</p> <p>“Wasteland comments on the bewildering complexity of technological change and the ramifications of those changes on society. The work is cautionary, but not prescriptive or didactic. The perceiver, perhaps unaware of the hidden aesthetics and stubborn difficulties of contemporary waste, is challenged to comprehend the meaning of so many feverishly patched computer boards. These industrial discards mark time, as modern day fossils in an uncertain landscape, indicating that, in this era, right answers are hard to find and common sense solutions less than adequate.</p><p>“Wasteland” explores the boundary between the useful and worthless. The juxtaposition of discarded computer boards with obsessive stitching, pushes this paradoxically seductive media beyond its simple found beauty to exploration of the art history - from the Neolithic to the Contemporary. Leather frames border each piece, simultaneously connecting and breaking the composition’s discrete sections. </p> <p>“These arrangements lead the viewer to ponder the scale and meaning of the materials presented. While retaining the qualities of a traditional American scrap quilt, viewers report interpretations as far ranging as microbial structures to aerial photographs of landscapes. Larger pieces can be examined closely for their detail or scanned as a whole for their dramatic composition. Mural sized designs have the ability to completely erase peripheral vision, leaving the onlooker lost in an intricate maze of manufactured parts.</p> <p>“Wasteland comments on the bewildering complexity of technological change and the ramifications of those changes on society. The work is cautionary, but not prescriptive or didactic. The perceiver, perhaps unaware of the hidden aesthetics and stubborn difficulties of contemporary waste, is challenged to comprehend the meaning of so many feverishly patched computer boards. These industrial discards mark time, as modern day fossils in an uncertain landscape, indicating that, in this era, right answers are hard to find and common sense solutions less than adequate.</p><p>“Wasteland” explores the boundary between the useful and worthless. The juxtaposition of discarded computer boards with obsessive stitching, pushes this paradoxically seductive media beyond its simple found beauty to exploration of the art history - from the Neolithic to the Contemporary. Leather frames border each piece, simultaneously connecting and breaking the composition’s discrete sections. </p> <p>“These arrangements lead the viewer to ponder the scale and meaning of the materials presented. While retaining the qualities of a traditional American scrap quilt, viewers report interpretations as far ranging as microbial structures to aerial photographs of landscapes. Larger pieces can be examined closely for their detail or scanned as a whole for their dramatic composition. Mural sized designs have the ability to completely erase peripheral vision, leaving the onlooker lost in an intricate maze of manufactured parts.</p> <p>“Wasteland comments on the bewildering complexity of technological change and the ramifications of those changes on society. The work is cautionary, but not prescriptive or didactic. The perceiver, perhaps unaware of the hidden aesthetics and stubborn difficulties of contemporary waste, is challenged to comprehend the meaning of so many feverishly patched computer boards. These industrial discards mark time, as modern day fossils in an uncertain landscape, indicating that, in this era, right answers are hard to find and common sense solutions less than adequate.</p><p>“Wasteland” explores the boundary between the useful and worthless. The juxtaposition of discarded computer boards with obsessive stitching, pushes this paradoxically seductive media beyond its simple found beauty to exploration of the art history - from the Neolithic to the Contemporary. Leather frames border each piece, simultaneously connecting and breaking the composition’s discrete sections. </p> <p>“These arrangements lead the viewer to ponder the scale and meaning of the materials presented. While retaining the qualities of a traditional American scrap quilt, viewers report interpretations as far ranging as microbial structures to aerial photographs of landscapes. Larger pieces can be examined closely for their detail or scanned as a whole for their dramatic composition. Mural sized designs have the ability to completely erase peripheral vision, leaving the onlooker lost in an intricate maze of manufactured parts.</p> <p>“Wasteland comments on the bewildering complexity of technological change and the ramifications of those changes on society. The work is cautionary, but not prescriptive or didactic. The perceiver, perhaps unaware of the hidden aesthetics and stubborn difficulties of contemporary waste, is challenged to comprehend the meaning of so many feverishly patched computer boards. These industrial discards mark time, as modern day fossils in an uncertain landscape, indicating that, in this era, right answers are hard to find and common sense solutions less than adequate.</p><p>“Wasteland” explores the boundary between the useful and worthless. The juxtaposition of discarded computer boards with obsessive stitching, pushes this paradoxically seductive media beyond its simple found beauty to exploration of the art history - from the Neolithic to the Contemporary. Leather frames border each piece, simultaneously connecting and breaking the composition’s discrete sections. </p> <p>“These arrangements lead the viewer to ponder the scale and meaning of the materials presented. While retaining the qualities of a traditional American scrap quilt, viewers report interpretations as far ranging as microbial structures to aerial photographs of landscapes. Larger pieces can be examined closely for their detail or scanned as a whole for their dramatic composition. Mural sized designs have the ability to completely erase peripheral vision, leaving the onlooker lost in an intricate maze of manufactured parts.</p> <p>“Wasteland comments on the bewildering complexity of technological change and the ramifications of those changes on society. The work is cautionary, but not prescriptive or didactic. The perceiver, perhaps unaware of the hidden aesthetics and stubborn difficulties of contemporary waste, is challenged to comprehend the meaning of so many feverishly patched computer boards. These industrial discards mark time, as modern day fossils in an uncertain landscape, indicating that, in this era, right answers are hard to find and common sense solutions less than adequate.</p>

Artist Bio

<p>Eric Celarier was born, and continues to live and work, in the Washington Area. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Maryland in 1991. He proceeded to the University of Cincinnati, where he received his M.A. in Fine Arts in 1997. He currently teaches and creates art in Montgomery County.</p>

<p>Celarier's work has recently been featured in the Washington Post in the “Weekend” and “Local Living” sections. His solo Black Rock Show of 2011 resulted in interviews by both by the Montgomery County Sentinel and the Gaithersburg Patch. He was juried and pronounced the winner of Nassau Community College’s “Borders: Visible & Invisible” show by Samantha Rippner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The James Renwick Alliance and DC Art Seen pronounced Celarier’s contribution to Artomatic 2009: “Best of Show”. His solo Greenbelt Community Center show received the attention and an interview from the Greenbelt Patch.</p><p>Eric Celarier was born, and continues to live and work, in the Washington Area. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Maryland in 1991. He proceeded to the University of Cincinnati, where he received his M.A. in Fine Arts in 1997. He currently teaches and creates art in Montgomery County.</p>

<p>Celarier's work has recently been featured in the Washington Post in the “Weekend” and “Local Living” sections. His solo Black Rock Show of 2011 resulted in interviews by both by the Montgomery County Sentinel and the Gaithersburg Patch. He was juried and pronounced the winner of Nassau Community College’s “Borders: Visible & Invisible” show by Samantha Rippner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The James Renwick Alliance and DC Art Seen pronounced Celarier’s contribution to Artomatic 2009: “Best of Show”. His solo Greenbelt Community Center show received the attention and an interview from the Greenbelt Patch.</p><p>Eric Celarier was born, and continues to live and work, in the Washington Area. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Maryland in 1991. He proceeded to the University of Cincinnati, where he received his M.A. in Fine Arts in 1997. He currently teaches and creates art in Montgomery County.</p>

<p>Celarier's work has recently been featured in the Washington Post in the “Weekend” and “Local Living” sections. His solo Black Rock Show of 2011 resulted in interviews by both by the Montgomery County Sentinel and the Gaithersburg Patch. He was juried and pronounced the winner of Nassau Community College’s “Borders: Visible & Invisible” show by Samantha Rippner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The James Renwick Alliance and DC Art Seen pronounced Celarier’s contribution to Artomatic 2009: “Best of Show”. His solo Greenbelt Community Center show received the attention and an interview from the Greenbelt Patch.</p><p>Eric Celarier was born, and continues to live and work, in the Washington Area. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Maryland in 1991. He proceeded to the University of Cincinnati, where he received his M.A. in Fine Arts in 1997. He currently teaches and creates art in Montgomery County.</p>

<p>Celarier's work has recently been featured in the Washington Post in the “Weekend” and “Local Living” sections. His solo Black Rock Show of 2011 resulted in interviews by both by the Montgomery County Sentinel and the Gaithersburg Patch. He was juried and pronounced the winner of Nassau Community College’s “Borders: Visible & Invisible” show by Samantha Rippner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The James Renwick Alliance and DC Art Seen pronounced Celarier’s contribution to Artomatic 2009: “Best of Show”. His solo Greenbelt Community Center show received the attention and an interview from the Greenbelt Patch.</p><p>Eric Celarier was born, and continues to live and work, in the Washington Area. He received his B.A. degree from the University of Maryland in 1991. He proceeded to the University of Cincinnati, where he received his M.A. in Fine Arts in 1997. He currently teaches and creates art in Montgomery County.</p>

<p>Celarier's work has recently been featured in the Washington Post in the “Weekend” and “Local Living” sections. His solo Black Rock Show of 2011 resulted in interviews by both by the Montgomery County Sentinel and the Gaithersburg Patch. He was juried and pronounced the winner of Nassau Community College’s “Borders: Visible & Invisible” show by Samantha Rippner of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The James Renwick Alliance and DC Art Seen pronounced Celarier’s contribution to Artomatic 2009: “Best of Show”. His solo Greenbelt Community Center show received the attention and an interview from the Greenbelt Patch.</p>