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ADVANCING THE ARTS ACROSS MARYLAND

APRIL RIMPO

APRIL RIMPO

Artist Work

Guatemalan Girl
2009
watercolor on aqua board
15.5" X 15.5"
City Reflections
2012
watercolor on paper
14" X 40"
The Vendor
2012
watercolor and acrylic on paper
29.5" X 18"
Poinsetta Tree
2010
watercolor and acrylic on paper
40" X 37"
Freight Yard
2014
fluid acrylic on gallery wrapped paper
25" X 45"
Free Living
2017
Fluid Acrylic
20" X 16"

Artist Information

County
Howard County
Artistic Category

Visual Arts

Artist Statement

April has been involved in art her whole life. She has worked in pencil, oil, stained glass, fused glass and watercolor. In her paintings her goal is to portray the emotions she perceives in the world. Her subject matter is diverse including portraits, landscapes, city scapes, and still life. She does portraits on commission. She loves color and uses lots of it in most of her work. Her glass art takes a more abstract approach in which she strives to attract her audience’s attention with both color and form while bringing in familiar shapes from the world of nature to arouse the curiosity of her viewers. April's fused glass projects are varied in technique, style and purpose. Some of her work is representational, while others explore textures, or strive to evoke an emotion through color and form.

Artist Bio

I first took private art lessons from a local teacher in my late teens. I have taken a variety of classes and attended workshops from many national and international watercolor and fused glass artists. I have attended watercolor workshops from Cheng-khee Chee, Don Andrews, Nicholas Simmons, John Salminen, Fritz Briggs, Tony van Hasselt, Carl Dalio, David Taylor, Debi Watson, Jean Uhl Spicer, Sandra Blair, Steve Fleming, Frank Francese, Judy Morris, John Salminen, Paul Jackson, Linda Baker, and numerous others.
My fused glass training starting in the 1990s when warm glass started to grow in the United States. I have taken classes from Linda Ethier, Roger Thomas, Judith Conway, Kevin O'Toole, Nathan Sandberg, and Bonnie Celeste.
"I feel a piece is successful when I think the mood I want is achieved and the story shines through in the finished painting. Real success comes, however, when you tell me the story you see in the painting. Often your story is quite different from mine, but it doesn't matter! I feel a tremendous sense of satisfaction for having been able to evoke a memory or an emotion in you. What more could I ask for as an artist?"